Keto diet foods keto diet recipes keto pills keto diet menu for beginners keto diet for beginners keto diet explained The troubling world of WiFi toxicity truthers on Instagram

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Keto diet foods keto diet recipes keto pills keto diet menu for beginners keto diet for beginners keto diet explained

keto diet foods  keto diet recipes  keto pills  keto diet menu for beginners  keto diet for beginners  keto diet explained The health and societal effects of tech can make us prone to fear-based misinformation.
The health and societal effects of tech can make us prone to fear-based misinformation.

Image: vicky leta / mashable

By Rachel Kraus

Radiation.

The word inspires fear and images of mushroom clouds and meltdowns. And when people hear that their WiFi routers and cellphones emit radiation, they get scared. 

In response, maybe they read the recent FDA and FCC reports saying the electromagnetic radiation produced by cellphones and wireless devices is safe for humans. Or maybe they get sucked into an Instagram hole, where people sell crystal pyramids that promise to convert radiation “into positive energy.” 

“Because radiation is such a scary term, I think it’s incredibly easy to mislead people,” said David Robert Grimes, a cancer researcher who studies public understanding of science. “I would argue there’s an awful lot of profiteering off of people’s fears and misunderstanding implicit in this weird Instagram world.”

You can find the hashtag #EMFprotection — which refers to electromagnetic field (EMF) radiation — on nearly 35,000 Instagram posts, many warning of the cancer risks of cellphones and WiFi routers. Many share conspiracy theories involving government and corporate cover-ups. And, of course, there are so, so many crystals, which promise to block radiation with “energy fields.” The problem is so bad the FTC warned against “cell phone radiation scams” on its consumer information page.

In both theory and practice, there’s little reason to view the radiation emitted by WiFi routers and cellphones as a health threat. 

The type of radiation emitted by our digital devices is what’s known as “non-ionizing,” meaning it does not contain enough energy to cause damage to cells, like sunlight or X-rays. Increased amounts of this kind of radiation do not change that; more weak particles do not make their effect stronger. 

There are so, so many crystals

Still, people are making money by warning people to avoid it. The popular account @emf_protection advertises crystals, de-toxifying patches, amulets, cellphone-shielding patches, stroller covers, and much more. It has over 21,000 followers, and is affiliated with a Gmail account (which Mashable contacted) called “The Fifth Ashram.” There is no other public information on who is behind this account, but there are plenty of links to buy products.

WiFi toxicity influencers aren’t just on Instagram. Ann Louise Gittleman, a nutritionist who promotes a diet that she describes as “detox beyond keto” and warns about the dangers of WiFi and cellular radiation, gave an extensive interview in Goop and sells a book, Zapped, on the topic.

Most recently, Miranda Kerr, the supermodel, wellness entrepreneur, and wife of Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel, gave an interview that went viral to NewBeauty about “healthy living.” In it, she describes the multiple products she uses to shield her home and family from EMF waves.

“We have a lot,” Kerr said. “We have the stickers you put on the back of your phone for radiation. I have the EMF detector that picks up the waves in the air. I’ve had the whole house checked by a professional who looks for things like EMF waves and things like that. I even have something installed in my Malibu house to turn out all the power while we sleep.”

Keto diet foods keto diet recipes keto pills keto diet menu for beginners keto diet for beginners keto diet explained Electromagnetic hypersensitivity

August Brice is warm and earnest, a bubbly former news broadcaster and marketer. These days, she runs an Instagram account called TechWellness with more than 11,000 followers, as well as a related website, where she aims to help people reform their relationships with technology. 

Her posts explore issues like privacy and screen time — as well as WiFi toxicity. As a sufferer of what she calls a “sensitivity” to WiFi radiation (also called electromagnetic hypersensitivity, or EHS), she considers EMF “like any other toxin.”

Brice and other sufferers maintain that they have science at their back, and post online about their own experiences in groups like “We Are the Evidence”

EHS is a real condition codified by the World Health Organization (WHO), with just one caveat: there’s no evidence that WiFi or cellular radiation causes these symptoms. 

“It’s a very real, very troubling condition,” Grimes said. “The only thing that sufferers get wrong is the cause of their malady.”

EHS’ symptoms are diffuse and not necessarily consistent from sufferer to sufferer, but often include skin inflammation and fatigue. 

Brice says she has felt negative physical effects like body zaps, nausea, and headaches ever since she first held a cellphone. So mixed among posts on issues like screen time are guides on how to reduce exposure to WiFi radiation. 

“It’s really resonating with mom

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